GD out, excellent communication skills and case-study analysis in at NMIMS

SVKMs Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies (NMIMS), is going to herald in big changes in its admission process for the 2013 batch. Besides doing away with the conventional ‘Group Discussion’ (GD), it is planning to introduce additional elements in its online entrance test – NMIMS Management Aptitude Test (NMAT) 2013.

 

 Dr. Rajan Saxena, Vice-Chancellor, NMIMS, said that the institute has been experimenting with the GD for two years and this year the changes will be cemented. “We moved away from the typical GD method and introduced the case-study one. We have seen over the years that a traditional GD throws up the same set of students.Those that come in after getting trained at coaching institutes. They all behave and speak in an expected manner. We wanted individual capabilities to come to the fore and the case study method allows it,” said Dr Saxena.

 

In this rather different kind of a GD, aspirants are given a case study to analyse and then discuss.” This method, helps us unearth characteristics such as logical thinking, decision-making, leadership and data analysis qualities in the aspirants,” added Dr Saxena.

 

Additionally, the term ‘GD’ will also meet its end this year and a new term, something on the lines of ‘Case-study discussion’ will be used at NMIMS.
 
 
Another big decision that NMIMS has taken, is to look at communication skills of applicants more keenly.” We believe that proper and efficient communication skills are very important to excel in corporate life and we will particularly look at them when admitting students,” added Dr Saxena.
 
 
One more big shift that NMIMS is working on is to add an ‘ethical’ dimension to the written test. “We have not fully thought through it but we are speaking to Pearson VUE. The plan is to test candidates on ethical decision making. Aspirants will be given typical corporate problems and asked to take hypothetical ethical decisions .” Dr Saxena disclosed.
 
It is the same story everywhere. B-schools tweaking admission procedures to increase diversity (read more non-engineers and women candidates.) “Next year we will come up with some more changes in the exam pattern to bring in additional diversity,” hinted the Vice-chancellor.
 
 

Registrations from NMAT 2013 have opened. Like last year, students will be be able to take the online test in a window period of about one and a half months from October 11 to December 19, 2012 with a choice of two retakes. In the cases of retakes, the best of three scores shall be considered for admissions to all the MBa programmes by the NMIMS institute at its Mumbai, Bengaluru & Hyderabad Campuses. NMAT 2013 will be conducted at 18 centers across the country.

Source :- pagalguy.com

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B-schools ranked 1-25 (non-IIMs) to offer 4531 seats in general category. (All campuses)

 By :-  Shashank Venkat and Astha A

Photo courtesy: kevin dooley (www.flickr.com)

 

Amongst the major changes,  XLRI, Jamshedpur has applied to the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) for an increase in the intake in its Post Graduate Programme in Business Management (BM) and Post Graduate Program in Human Resource Management (HRM) by 60 seats each. This would increase the total intake of the institute from 240 to 360. However, this is subject to an approval from AICTE, which is pending.

 

Institute

No of seats

No of seats (2013-15)

Fees structure (2012-14) (in Rs for two years)

Fees structure (2013-15) (in Rs for two years)

5. ISB (Hyderabad, Mohali)

(Mohali campus not in top 25)

770

770

23,76,414

23,76,414

6. XLRI (Jamshedpur)

240

May be revised later

12,00000

12,00,000

7. FMS (Delhi)

226

226

21,000

21,000

10. IIFT (Delhi, Kolkata)

207 (Delhi – 150, Kolkata – 57)

May be revised later

13,00,000

May be revised later

11. JBIMS (Mumbai)

120

120

1,99,300

May be revised later

12. SJMSoM, IIT Bombay

120

120

8,98,902

8,98,902

13. SPJIMR (Mumbai)

240

240

9,50,000

9,50,000

14. MDI (Gurgaon)

335

May be revised later

12,00,000

May be revised later

15. NITIE (Mumbai)

274

274

6,00,000

6,26,000 (increase)

16. NMIMS (Mumbai)

300

360

10,20,000

12,00,000 (increase)

NMIMS (Bangalore)

(not in top 25)

120

120

8,00,000

9,00,000 (increase)

NMIMS (Hydrabad)

(not in top 25)

60

60

8,00,000

9,00,000 (increase)

16. SIBM (Pune)

 

180

180

10,00,000

May be revised later

18. IMT (Ghaziabad)

480

480

12,70,000

12,70,000

IMT (Hydrabad)

(not in top 25)

180

240 (increase)

10,15,000

10,15,000

IMT (Nagpur)

(not in top 25)

360

360

10,15,000

10,15,000

19. MICA (Ahmedabad)

180

180

12,00,000

May be revised later

20. TISS (Mumbai)

60

60

1,00,000 (without hostel)/2,00,000 (with hostel)

May be revised later

21. DMS, IIT Delhi

115

115

4,24,000

4,24,000

22. VGSoM, IIT Kharagpur

160

160

6,80,000

6,80,000

23. XIM (Bhubhaneshwar)

300

300

9,00,000

9,00,000

24. SCMHRD (Pune)

200

200

9,80,000

10,40,600 (increase)

Of the top 25 b-schools (exclusing the IIM’s), ten institutes have reservations. These include:

FMS, Delhi – Out of 226 seats, 112 seats are reserved (49.5%). The percentage of reserved seats for NC/OBC is 27% (61 seats), for SC it is 15% (34 seats) and for ST it is 7.5% (17 seats).

IIFT, Delhi & Kolkata – 23% seats are reserved for Other Backward Class, whereas for Schedule Castes it is 15%, 4% for NRI and Schedule Tribes it is 7.5%. This leaves 102 seats under the reserved category.

JBIMS, Mumbai – 19% seats are reserved for other backward class, whereas SC has 13%, ST has 7%. Overall 60 seats are there in JBIMS for reserved category.

SJMSoM, IIT Bombay – OBC and NC: 27% (32 seats), SC: 15% (18 seats), ST: 7.5% (9 seats)

NITIE, Mumbai – 27% seats are reserved for Other Backward Classes, whereas for Schedule Caste it is 15% and Schedule Tribe it is 7.5%. This leaves 137 seats for the general category.

SIBM, Pune – As per Symbiosis International University (SIU) regulations, 15% seats are reserved for SC, 7.5% for ST and 3% for differently abled. There are also two seats for Kashmiri Migrants (children of migrants from J&K; valley) and 15% seats for International students. This makes the total number of reserved seats 75.

TISS, Mumbai – Of the total 60 seats, 49.5% (30 seats) are reserved.

DMS , IIT Delhi – Of the total 115 seats, 49.5% (57 seats) are reserved.

VGSoM, IIT Kharagpur – Out of a total 160 seats, the general category has 79 seats. This leaves 81 seats in the reserved category.

SCMHRD, Pune – As per Symbiosis International University (SIU) regulations, 15% seats are reserved for SC, 7.5% for ST and 3% for differently abled. There are also two seats for Kashmiri Migrants (children of migrants from J&K; valley) and 15% seats for International students. This makes the total reserved seats 83.

 

Source :- pagalguy.com

10 Questions you should ask before joining a Business School in India

Ask these 10 questions and there is a good chance that you will not make a mistake while choosing a business school in India.  Hopefully, answers to these 10 questions will help clear all your confusion.

Do not blindly trust students from media cells or PR companies commissioned to promote business schools. It is their job to create a rosy picture. If you do not have enough credible data on all these points listed below or if the business schools and students refrain from sharing details, you need to be even more discerning.

1) What is the background of the faculty?

It is often the least researched aspect by potential students in India since placements gloss over everything else. However, quality faculty is the single biggest reason that makes a business school truly worth the investment. You should scan their profiles and see where they’ve earned their Doctorate from or which companies they have been associated with. It would be unfair to paint everyone with the same brush but it always helps if professors have been in the industry or have done research at top universities. There are plenty of professors  in some of the top schools in India who have very questionable backgrounds.  However, always check with alumni and current students too!

2) What kind of profiles are offered and what kind of companies visit the campus for recruitment?

Asking for salary figures and 100% placements is the worst way to choose a business school. We will come to that later. But, you need to ask the right questions about placements.  Salary figures are inflated, unaudited and loosely calculated by even the best schools in India. Always remember that you are building a career.

Beware of deception. For e.g. Is the job offered by the multi-national bank in the technology function and is the business school fooling you by reporting it under the Finance domain?  Will you be working for a bank or actually be a part of a KPO?

Scan names of companies and profiles they offer. Try and find out how many students are recruited. Do thorough research.

Schools that can consistently court top companies for the kind of profiles you seek are the ones you should target.

3) What is the placement policy of the business school?

Indian schools are becoming increasingly notorious for churning out unhappy and dissatisfied professionals. In the race to get everyone a job, extremely poor career policies are in place. The focus is on quantity over quality and the system is designed to make graduates insecure and they end up settling for the wrong job. The result : The graduate is looking out for a new job in the first week of joining his/her company. Everyone is the loser here. The company, the student and the business school (the schools loses brand equity among recruiters). You do not want to be in such a business school.

There are schools that force students to take jobs they do not want or sign out in order to declare 100% placements. Ask students about placement policies. Can you decline an offer? Do companies have a pecking order of visiting the campus or do they turn up randomly? Is there a concept of dream companies?

In the end, we would say that you would be better served if you do not have an attitude of entitlement in terms of landing a plush job from campus. But, when you decide to join a business school it will only help to make choices that maximize your probability of getting there!

4) What are my chances of getting international exposure?

Student exchange programmes help. But be careful. Find out the number of seats on offer. Look at the quality of schools where a tie-up is in place. Are there academicians and foreign companies who collaborate with your school? Are there foreign students who will add a new perspective to the classroom?

This is another highly ignored aspect by potential Indian students. You will only know the worth of interaction with students and professors from international schools after doing it. It exposes you to different cultures and mindsets.

5) What is the infrastructure in the business school?

Your experience can be ruined at a place with eternal infrastructure problems. A large campus with state of art infrastructure goes a long way in making your business school experience memorable and even in developing your personality. Visit the campus if possible. Look at connectivity by air and train. Is there a thriving eco-system around the campus that can support a world class business school?

InsideIIM_BSchool_Selectionchecklist

6) Are the alumni happy?

Speak to 3 alumni (all different years if possible) and speak to 3 current students (from different backgrounds if possible). Usually, if you are perceptive enough you will easily figure out whether the place has any culture and unity. Do people have a sense of pride after having graduated from the place? How do they feel 3 years after graduation?

In many ways, this is the acid test. Indifferent alumni means the school will never really go too far and that has an impact on your career.

7) What is the pedagogy?

Kotler’s original work was written prior to 1960.  The world of finance has changed completely over the last 2 decades. If a business school still follows archaic teaching methods, your tuition fees are worth nothing. Are innovative tools used for learning on campus? Do professors go out of their way to be updated with the latest in their field? What proportion of your work is on the field? Experiential learning, anyone?

8) What is the profile of my peers?

Now, this is a tough one in the Indian context since same kind of junta applies to all schools but it is still worth looking at. You are bound to learn more in a school with more diversity. And diversity not only in terms of gender but also in terms of graduation streams, work experience, international schooling/work experience, people from entrepreneurial backgrounds etc.

9) Fees, Scholarships and Financial Assistance

EMIs as a result of student loans can cripple you. Especially, if you graduate without landing a job that pays you at least INR 50,000 per month in hand. In such a scenario, the cost of the MBA programme becomes an important determinant of your choice of school.  There are practically no meaningful scholarships in India. The Aditya Birla and the OP Jindal scholarships are received by very few people and does not cover even 25% of the cost of the MBA programme in most cases.  A lot of schools have large NBFA (Need Based Financial Assistance) kitties but the criteria is so stringent that most middle class general category students will again never be eligible for it.

Do not compromise on your MBA experience by going for an altogether inferior programme. But be mindful of the difference in the fees.  If one saves INR 600,000 – 800,000 upfront it can have a material impact over the period of the entire repayment of the loan.

10 ) What does your heart say?

Follow your instincts. The heart is always right. Do you get a good feeling about a place? Do alumni of certain schools attract you more?  Are you taking the plunge treating your decision as a compromise?  Answer these questions truthfully. You will seldom regret a decision taken on instinct. Those taken after lengthy deliberations aren’t always the best decisions.

Very few schools in India will score well on all the points mentioned above. But this exercise will help keep your expectations real before you enter a business school.

Source :- insideiim.com

What to expect after completing MBA

This is the time of the year when the academic year at the business schools have reached its climax or even concluded. There is no doubt about the fact that it marks as a huge accomplishment for the freshly-minted MBA grads. However, the picture may not always be as rosy as it looks as and what to expect after graduation can often put a graduate in despair in anticipation about the future.

So, what can one expect after completing an MBA?

The hard work continues

A common misconception prevalent is that an MBA guarantees you success in life and career. Putting in all the efforts for two years doesn’t ensure a breathing space where you can sit back and relax. Just because of the fact that you have graduated from a business school does not mean employers will come to you for offering jobs. You have to look for them and continue the hard work until you find yourself one that is aligned to your aspirations. The story does not even end there and calls for putting in hours in the job and earn you a name professionally.

A salary hike

Accept it or not, most of the candidates have opted for MBA for the financial rewards it promises. Yes, career advancement in the current job is also amongst the reasons. As per a survey, MBA graduates have reported a growth of an astonishing 81% in their pre-MBA salaries. These numbers are based on various factors like the number of years of work experience, skills and sometimes gender as well (unfortunately). However, there is no doubt about the fact that an MBA graduate definitely receives a significant hike after their stint at a business school.

Rise in expectations

Once you complete a rigorous MBA program, there are bound to be expectations from everyone around. This is not just restricted to your family and friends but also in your professional circles like your managers and colleagues. Living up to the expectations of everyone is not always easy and therefore it would be wise to ensure that you know your limitations and make sure that the people know about them as well. This will definitely save you a lot of time and stress that might arise under the burden of the high expectations.

Get back to your social life

It’s no secret that MBA students barely have time for social activities in between juggle work and school, but as business school comes to an end, MBA graduates find that they now have time to spare. It’s okay to take time off to relax and unwind. Just don’t let a week of rest turn into laziness and apathy. Use this downtime wisely and reconnect with friends, go on a well-deserved holiday, or learn a new sport or hobby.

 

source :- mbaupdates.com

Best Job Profiles after MBA

  1. Technology. In 2007, MBA grads rated technology companies as some of the most “sought after” fortune 500 companies. MBA grads who work in the field of technology work in technical computer or managerial positions. They also come up with the latest innovations for software products and design marketing strategies.
  2. Management Consulting. Many MBA grads work for management consulting firms. MBA grads are used for their strategic business thinking abilities and finance experience.
  3. International Investment Management.
  4. Banks and investment firms hire MBA grads to help customers with their portfolios and recommend investments. MBA graduates can manage international bank accounts and investments.
  5. Law School. If you just graduated business school, you might think more school sounds crazy. Actually, having an MBA can look great on your application for Law school. If you are interested in business law (even if you don’t want to be a lawyer), getting a JD in addition to your MBA might be advantageous. This is especially true if you are interested in business or corporate law.
  6. Non-profit Leadership. Another best job for MBA graduates is found in the non-profit sector. You could manage non-profit research projects in the social or natural sciences. Project managersmanage the budget for projects, hire teams and ensure fiscal responsibility. You could also direct the charity program of your choosing, including political organizations.
  7. Marketing. Another common job for recent MBA graduates is in the world of marketing. You could obtain a job as the marketing director of any of your favorite products. If you are skilled in design, you could develop products (anything from shoes to computers) or develop strategies to market products to a range of potential customers. 
  8. Data Analyst. A data analyst examines data and recommends financial decisions using statistical methods. A data analyst is an ideal job for an MBA grad, especially if you enjoy working with numbers. Data analysts seek to eliminate company loss and recommend plans to improve fiscal performance.
  9. Accountant. As an MBA grad, you are qualified for Accounting. To be an actual “Accountant” you will need to take a comprehensive exam. Having an MBA will generally make you more money than an accountant without an MBA. Having extensive knowledge of how to conduct business, you could even become partner in an accounting firm or start your own accounting practice.
  10. Entrepreneur. If you can’t find the best job with your MBA, consider starting your own company. You have surely obtained innovative skills and you understand marketing. You have also likely met others in your MBA program who might be interested in starting a company with you.
  11. Business Executive. Most tops business executives have earned an MBA. Recent MBA grads will rarely find themselves being offered an executive position (unless it is for a non-profit or start-up company). You can work your way up to executive over time, CEOs are common jobs for MBA grads.

Source :- placementsaftermba.blogspot.in

Corruption Is the Root Cause of Economic Slowdown in India

Corruption is omnipresent. From micro-institutions to macro-institution, from local to government institutes each operated and continued to exist and flourish with its own set of corruption activities.  What should be noted here is that corruption is going to exist as long as planet earth does. There is plausible end to the institution of corruption, which though illegal is unconsciously legal, especially in developing countries like China and India. Not with the intention of promoting corruption but the truth is that, India has to grow with it and yes it is growing with it , of course the slowdown is partial but it nothing as compared to how slow things would become without it.

In a diverse and developing India the root cause of corruption is the low quality integration of the executive body and the judiciary. This is the key link to the successful management of any state or governing body. The executive body in India comprises of selfishly motivated politician and bureaucrats that make a low impact on the policies and society at large. Delving deeper into the core issues that trigger bouts and make corruption rampant are the desires for more luxury, more money, more power. More the power more is the capacity to circumvent the law, thereby making space for more corrupt practices. The education and literacy levels are low and thus people get attracted to illegal practices to move higher up in any aspect of life, be it buying seats for children in educational institutes or buying seats to bolster their career development. Alright, corruption happens everywhere but the real problem maker in here is the easy going punishment system with lax rules of punishing offenders.  Also an associate of corruption that works in closely is nepotism that kind of protects and promotes the entire idea of corruption. In fact, MBAupdates feel that nepotism is the real cause of corruption. Most of the offenders are people who feel they have the power to commit a crime as they have the power the go away scot-free and this is exactly where India makes it different form the other countries where citizens fear law and punishment if nothing else.

We conclude that corruption though illegal is quite an inevitable institution that one has to deal with, whether one likes it and promotes it or not, economic growth will occur with it, rather have to move simultaneously. It has become such an integral part of the bigger development and macro functioning of the economy that to get rid of it and to remove it from your growth equation may shift the entire growth trajectory. The structure of the country, the formal and informal sector, the black and the white sector, the blue collar and the white collar, the privileged and the under-privileged, the urban and the rural, the fundamental dichotomy does not allow corruption to die away as long as growth is on the agenda. Nepotism though, still remains on the top of list, a prime mover of the corruption in India today. Maybe it’s too late for growth to be entirely affected by it. 

Source :- mbaupdates.com

Importance of GD in MBA admissions

Group discussions have their own importance in the procedural MBA admissions, no matter which college or B-school we are talking about, group discussions essentials can take one a long way securing a steadfast admission into the college. These group discussions are good, and well, they are good for a reason. Merely preparing for them during admission actually does prepare you for the coursework of your MBA class. We tell you why group discussions matter for each of you desiring to step up into a good B-school or even for those who have managed to get their seat secured.

Shared knowledge runs deep

It is a fact that when you are studying alone for an exam you don’t remember key points, but if you discuss an answer with your friends just before the exam paper you tend to remember it better. The more you discuss the better you learn. This is one of the key essentials that make out an MBA programs from the rest of the general course ware. MBA classes and even entrance exams encourage students to speak up which makes a difference to their knowledge quotient. This knowledge of one person kind of challenges another during entrance exams groups discussions which heats up the discussion even further and reveals the best of each person, which is essential for the examiner.

Leadership Value

The leadership value in each student is recognized in the preliminary stage of group discussion itself. These group discussions actually navigate the discussion towards the students and voice the best leader‘s strongest voice which is an acceptable and most preferred option at that point in time, given the current argument.

Confidence Givers

Most of the MBA students are scared during admission as well as during the start of the coursework. However, very soon this fear dissolves right in the beginning with the group discussion that marks the cloaking of fear with a public platform to speak on, argue on and prove your point right. Whether the student’s viewpoint is taken or forsaken the student gains the podium to talk, speak and express, which is in all cases an essentially these days, especially for MBA students.

Communication and interpersonal skills

As expressed in the earlier point, students are scared. Think about it, how many of you are scared of talking in front of people, making presentations, answering in public and making your viewpoint felt and ascertained? Yes, there are umpteen people, in fact 7 out of 10 people suffer from these frights and they are natural. The great news is that no MBA grads suffer from these frights even though if they did before the MBA program. This is exactly how the group discussion pre and post MBA admissions help.

Thus, there is no doubt that a group discussion is the forerunner of the breaking the fears of expression and communication which MBA aspirants have and which they ideally should not have.

Source :- mbaupdates.com